Tips for Using Springform Pans

Don’t Let Your Springform Pan Leak If your batter is especially thin or there is a great deal of sugar in your recipe, your pan may leak through the seam along the base of the pan. (Only once have we had a minor leak with one of our pans—and we’ve used them with lots of the recipes.) To protect against a leak, wrap the base of the pan with aluminum foil. Please note that with aluminum foil shielding the heat, it may take just a little longer to bake. Beware the Metallic Taste from Tinny Springform Pan Bases Tinned, aluminum, …

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How to Choose the Right Springform Pan

Choosing the right springform pan is all about what you bake and how you plan to bake it. In this article, we’ll outline out the advantages and disadvantages of different types and explain how what you bake affects the right choice for you. About the Springform Pan The advantage of springform pans is the removable ring. Instead of digging a slice of dessert from a pan, marring the pan, and crumbling the cake; you simply pop the ring off. You can then cut and serve your dessert right from the base. This is especially significant with cheesecakes and other fragile desserts …

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Using Substitutes in Pie Recipes

Pies are for freelance baking. You can choose your own filling, crust, method, and ingredients.In this piece, we’ll explore some of these choices—the pro’s and the con’s—to help you make that special pie recipe uniquely yours. Flour vs. Cornstarch in Pie Recipes All fruit pies have thickened slurries made with either flour or cornstarch to get the right consistency for the filling. Each requires a different method. Cornstarch slurries are made on the stovetop while flour slurries are usually created by tossing the fruit with flour or mixing the flour into a slurry in a bowl and pouring it over …

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Hey, anyone can make a perfect pie . . .

Here’s how to build the perfect pie. Anyone can put a filling in a pie shell.  It’s the pie crust that gives folks pause. Making the Crust From scratch: The secret is to keep the butter and/or shortening from melting.  If the fat melts, the crust bakes hard as a rock. Folks chill their rolling pin and often ingredients before starting.  Use a pastry knife to cut the fat into the flour until you have pea-sized pebbles, add ice water, and mix it only until you have a dough ball. Roll the dough to thin ¼-inch thick and cut circles …

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